Icecream

Icecream

 

 

There was a time when ice cream meant a pail, an ice and salt mixture on the outside and the ice cream mixture on the inside and a lot of cranking. The handle had to be manually turned to churn the cream inside so that it was smooth and frozen. It all began in Baltimore when Jack Fussell went large-scale with his ice cream. He was a dairyman and he was looking fort something that would make use of his excess cream – and from then on, there was no stopping the popularity of ice cream. He came to be known as the father of American ice cream.

Going back in time, the Egyptians, the Persians, the Greeks, the Babylonians and the Romans were all fascinated with ice and very often, it was carried hundreds of miles so the rich ones in these cultures could enjoy it. Some of them made a dessert out of it by mixing in fruits and honey. Others chilled their traditional desserts on the ice so it could be served chilled. There are stories of King Charles I’s famous cook and his delicious chilled concoctions, there are tales about Marco Polo and how he brought back sorbets from his travels, there are stories about Nero freezing his fruit drinks. Whatever the story, the path to ice cream was well defined and there was no turning back.

As time went by, mechanical measures came into being and ice cream wasn’t so hard to make any more – all that churning was good but impractical when it came to supply on a large scale. With the invention of the refrigerator, the ice cream industry burst into the forefront.